Worldwide Actions > UK Actions > Hunt Saboteurs Assoc.

HARE COURSING....

Organised hare coursing is followed by a few thousand people in Britain today. More coursing is done outside official clubs and a courser can operate within a club one day and outside it the next. The hare coursing season runs from September through to March. The highlight of the coursing year is the Waterloo Cup, held at Altcar, where hundreds of hares may be coursed.

The aim of hare coursing is for two dogs (usually greyhounds) to compete with each other in a test of speed and agility in pursuit of a live hare.

There are three types of coursing: 1) Static coursing where hares are driven onto a particular field to be coursed 2) Rough or 'walk-up' coursing where a line of coursers and supporters walk across country flushing out hares as they go, and 3) Park or enclosed coursing in which hares are caught and held captive before the event and released into an enclosed arena to be coursed.

The last form only takes place officially in Northern Ireland and Eire. In all forms of coursing the two dogs competing are held back by a man called the 'slipper', who waits until the sighted hare has approximately an 80-yard start, before releasing both dogs. The dogs used for coursing are faster than the hare, which then has to rely on twisting and turning to avoid capture. Points are awarded for how the individual dogs cope with this 'turning', by a judge on horseback.

Coursing supporters admit that one in five hares are caught by the dogs, although the real estimate is probably much higher, depending on conditions.. Caught hares often become the subject of a living tug of war between the dogs, lasting many minutes before supporters can retrieve it and finally put the terrified animal out of its misery.

AND HOW TO STOP IT...

The best way to prevent any hares being killed at a coursing meet is to ensure that there no hares in the vicinity of the coursing field.

Hunt saboteurs do this by employing the tactic of pre-beating ('beating' refers to beating the ground to panic animals into fleeing in a certain direction). Large numbers of sabs wearing bright clothing and waving bright flags or fertiliser bags, walk in a straight line driving hares downwind, outward and away from the coursing fields . Whistles and horns are also blown to encourage the hare to run in front of the saboteurs and away from the coursers. As hares do not like to be on unfamiliar ground, sabs may have to remain in strategic positions to prevent the hares returning to the coursing field.

It is not difficult to sabotage a coursing meeting - the tactics used can be taught in a morning, and if you can walk, make noise and work with people as a team, you can sabotage a coursing meet and save the lives of many hares.
Please Note: Don't try this on your own as hare-coursers have a well earned reputation for violence against sabs.

The best way to prevent any hares being killed at a coursing meet is to ensure that there no hares in the vicinity of the coursing field. Hunt saboteurs do this by employing the tactic of pre-beating. Large numbers of sabs wearing bright clothing and waving bright flags or fertiliser bags, walk in a straight line driving hares downwind, outward and away from the coursing fields . Whistles and horns are also blown to encourage the hare to run in front of the saboteurs and away from the coursers. As hares do not like to be on unfamiliar ground, sabs may have to remain in strategic positions to prevent the hares returning to the coursing field.

It is not difficult to sabotage a coursing meeting - the tactics used can be taught in a morning, and if you can walk, make noise and work with people as a team, you can sabotage a coursing meet and save the lives of many hares.