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Link: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16866547/

Refrigerator duck plays Lazarus again

Bird that lived 2 days in fridge after being shot flat-lines in surgery, revives

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Duck still alive after brushes with death (Video at Link)

Jan. 29: A ring-necked duck nicknamed "Perky" is garnering international fame after surviving at least three brushes with death. Mike Vasilinda reports.

NBC News Channel

Updated: 3:26 p.m. MT Jan 29, 2007

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - Call her Lazarus and then some.

The ring-neck duck has been shot by a hunter, rescued from two days in a refrigerator by his wife and � in its latest brush with death � resuscitated on a veterinarian's operating table.

The one-pound female duck stopped breathing Saturday during an operation to repair gunshot damage to her wing, said Noni Beck of Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary. Veterinarian David Hale performed CPR and managed to get the fractured fowl breathing again after several tense moments.

"I started crying, 'She's alive!'" Beck said.

Perky grabbed national attention last week after a hunter's wife opened her refrigerator door and the supposedly dead duck lifted its head and looked at her. The duck had been in the fridge for two days since it was shot and mistaken for dead on Jan. 15.

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Shot duck survives 2 days in refrigerator (below)


Perky, who now has a pin in hers wing, will probably not undergo any more surgery because of a sensitivity to anesthesia, Hale said. The duck is recovering from its latest ordeal.


Link: http://www.startribune.com/217/story/965516.html

'She's alive!':
Duck ducks death a third time

Perky is one tough bird.

Last update: January 29, 2007 7:19 AM

Perky is one tough bird.

The ringneck duck survived being shot and spending two days in a hunter's refrigerator -- and now she's had a close brush with death on a veterinarian's operating table.

The one-pound female duck stopped breathing Saturday during surgery to repair gunshot damage to one wing, said Noni Beck of the Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary in Tallahassee, Fla.

Veterinarian David Hale revived the bird by performing CPR. Said Beck: "I started crying, 'She's alive!' "

Perky entered the headlines last week after a hunter's wife opened her refrigerator door and the should've-been-dead duck lifted its head and looked at her. The bird had been in the fridge for two days since being shot and presumed killed Jan. 15.

Perky is recovering with a pin installed in the fractured wing, and probably will not have more surgery because of her sensitivity to anesthesia, Hale said.


Link: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16725051/
Shot duck survives 2 days in refrigerator

Updated: 4:31 p.m. MT Jan 20, 2007

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - Neither gunfire nor two days in a refrigerator could slay this duck.

When the wife of the hunter who shot it opened the refrigerator door, the duck lifted its head, giving her a scare.

The man�s wife �was going to check on the refrigerator because it hadn�t been working right and when she opened the door, it looked up at her,� said Laina Whipple, a receptionist at Killearn Animal Hospital. �She freaked out and told the daughter to take it to the hospital right then and there.�

The 1-pound female ringneck ended up at Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary, where it has been treated since Tuesday for wounds to its wing and leg.

Sanctuary veterinarian David Hale said it has about a 75 percent chance of survival, but probably won�t ever be well enough to be released back into the wild.

He said the duck, which has a low metabolism, could have survived in a big enough refrigerator, especially if the door was opened and closed several times. And he said he understands how the hunter thought the duck was dead.

�This duck is very passive,� Hale said. �It�s not like trying to pick up a Muscovy at Lake Ella, where you put your life in your hands.�


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